My Photo

August 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Blog powered by Typepad

« Nothing Happens | Main | "This Song Is For You, My Brother!" »

July 31, 2019

Comments

ANNE RASO

I have lived in Yorkville since early 1986 and I have to say that no other thoroughfare looks more like a Jersey mall that 86th between Lex and York. There were still some German places up until the early 90s but now all you have are Schaller & Weber and The Heidelberg. The amount of glass towers is incredible. Where do they find the tenants for all these towers where the condos start at 1.5 million with a huge amount of maintenance and taxes? By the way, I want to say “kudos” to S&W for recently refusing to sell even though they were offered 24 million. No doubt that another ugly steel and glass tower would have been built on their space which has not changed much in 80 or 85 years except for expanding into the next storefront south of their original store.

Boourns

I lived on east 95th from my mid teens until just after college. I loved everything about the UES from 96th down to about 79th—this was the mid 90s up to around 9/11-ish... Exponentially safer and civilized with every year, a quiet respite from a downtown that I still only felt comfy dipping my toes into here and there. Good, cheap food still abounded. Beautiful blocks to take walks down in the middle of the night listening to my discman. Pretty preppy girls who would never give me the time of day but I was always inspired to try for their attention. No fucking cell phones. I remember that time and area fondly.

I had no idea back then that the gradual stability coming to NYC would open the floodgates for the robber-barons of the world financial system to rape it to its core. Now, when I walk around the UES, I recognize very little. As the previous poster mentioned, 86th looks like some sort of suburban shopping strip plopped into Manhattan. Little mom and pop businesses that thrived for decades now sit as vacant, dark pock marks on entire blocks of high rent blight. Places that served entire generations like the Ray's on 2nd and 95th as providers of cheap sustenance and a place to just *be* for a little while—whether teenager or elderly or in-between—get ripped out seemingly overnight, replaced by vacant space that will undoubtedly rotate between overwhelmed and indebted tenants for decades to come.

Everything is cyclical, so I'm sure at some point Manhattan will become scorched commercial Earth and individualism and the middle class will thrive again within its confines. But I don't see that happening in our lifetimes. At least I have my memories.

Verify your Comment

Previewing your Comment

This is only a preview. Your comment has not yet been posted.

Working...
Your comment could not be posted. Error type:
Your comment has been saved. Comments are moderated and will not appear until approved by the author. Post another comment

The letters and numbers you entered did not match the image. Please try again.

As a final step before posting your comment, enter the letters and numbers you see in the image below. This prevents automated programs from posting comments.

Having trouble reading this image? View an alternate.

Working...

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear until the author has approved them.

Your Information

(Name is required. Email address will not be displayed with the comment.)